August 2021

Letter from Felix Smith on the duties and responsibilities of public servants

Badlands is always honored whenever it receives a letter from Dr. Felix Smith, the great US Fish and Wildlife Service biologist who was in the first team that blew the whistle on the poisoning of Kesterson Wildlife Refuge by heavy-metal laden agricultural runoff from Westlands Water District, a great act of governmental malfeasance by the Service, the Bureau of Reclamation and other state and federal resource agencies. If you ever thought scientists were wimps, I'd like to introduce Badlands readers once again to Felix Smith, a heroic scientist and whistleblower.

Letter from Felix Smith on the duties and responsibilities of public servants

Badlands is always honored whenever it receives a letter from Dr. Felix Smith, the great US Fish and Wildlife Service biologist who was in the first team that blew the whistle on the poisoning of Kesterson Wildlife Refuge by heavy-metal laden agricultural runoff from Westlands Water District, a great act of governmental malfeasance by the Service, the Bureau of Reclamation and other state and federal resource agencies. If you ever thought scientists were wimps, I'd like to introduce Badlands readers once again to Felix Smith, a heroic scientist and whistleblower.

Remembering John Wesley Powell in a dry year

It is sometimes terrible to realize how much more intelligent some earlier Western Americans were than our present leaders are; but that feeling is part of the prolonged tragedy we are living through long after the prophets have come, spoken, and gone, and Manifest Destiny has won such an impressive victory over science.

The power of a great question

8-17-21

Consortiumnews

The Climate Stat We Can’t Afford to Overlook: CEO Pay

If top U.S. corporate execs are still pocketing jackpots a decade from now, our environment has no shot, writes Sam Pizzigati.

By Sam Pizzigati 
Inequality.org

Ace researchers dropped two blockbuster reports on us last week. The first — from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the IPCC — hit with a worldwide thunderclap.

The access water journalism of Mark Arax

How far down the water has descended, how salty it’s become, isn’t something farmers like to advertise. Angell, with the support of his wife and his son and a Stanford graduate student who’s crunching the data, knows he’s taking a risk by going public. “Every well we work on, we’re measuring the standing water level. If I can get a farmer to listen, I tell him we can’t keep on doing this. It’s not going to last. Another dam won’t solve this. Another flood won’t solve this.”

Monbiot on Nature's vital cavities and the need for a slow ecology movement

8-16-21
www.monbiot.com
Noble Rot
Protecting the natural world means creating tomorrow’s ancient habitats.
By George Monbiot

We have a slow food movement and a slow travel movement. But we’re missing something, and its absence contributes to our escalating crisis. We need a slow ecology movement, and we need it fast.