Former Castle Air Force Base

"Public trust doctrine requires ..."

Submitted: Dec 14, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 Public trust doctrine requires that natural resources like water be shared equitably. That means there must be diverse use of the water by the various interests that comprise the public. -- Jody Hallstrom, Modesto Bee, Nov. 25, 2016

Ms. Hallstrom's mention of the centrality of the Public Trust Doctrine is most timely, considering the recent federal water bill, which favors agribusiness over vital environmental interests.

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Hillary Clinton: Ol' "Honey" Bill's candidate for president

Submitted: Jul 27, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 We were impressed by this note by Michael Moore in a section in the July 18 issue of The Nation called "We still need a future to believe in." Perhaps it was because it accords with our own gloomy view. Despite a real Murderers Row of Democratic Party orators on the opening night of the party's convention -- Sen. Cory Booker, First Lady Michelle Obama, Sen. Elizabeth Warren -- and a speech for the history books by Sen. Bernie Sanders, our fears of political chaos in the Democratic Party are not allayed.

In the Democratic Party of 2016, everybody's special; ordinary Americans need not apply, and just might not, much. These successful aspirants -- Booker, the Obamas, Warren, Bill and Hill -- who found their social ladders to climb in academia and politics -- are no inspiration for ordinary people who lack these particular gifts and historical opportunity. And, of course, there is no reward for any child who lacks the ambition to out-compete his schoolmates.

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"... a power over nature out of all proportion to their moral strength"

Submitted: May 29, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

PRINCETON  New Jersey, February 25, 1967: Six hundred people gather to commemorate the life of J. Robert Oppenheimer, "father of the Atomic Bomb." George Kennan, veteran diplomat, ambassador and "father" of the postwar containment policy against the Soviet Union, said: "On no one did there ever rest with greater cruelty the dilemmas evoked by the recent conquest by human beings of a power over nature out of all proportion to their moral strength. No one ever saw more clearly the dangers arising for humanity from this mounting disparity. This anxiety never shook his faith in the value of the search for truth in all its forms, scientific and humane. But there was no one who more passionately desired to be useful in averting the catastrophes to which the development of the weapons of mass destruction threatened to lead. It was the interests of mankind that he had in mind here; but it was as an American, and through the medium of this national community to which he belonged, that he saw his greatest possibilities for pursuing these aspirations.

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What kind of issue is a field of solar panels on farmland?

Submitted: Nov 18, 2012
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board


“In the end,” says Davidson, who spent a month in Germany studying the Energiewende, “it isn’t about making money. It’s about quality of life.”
-- Thomas Hedges, Truthdig, Nov. 15, 2012

 

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A water bill to believe in

Submitted: Sep 27, 2012
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

9-26-12
Inland Valley News

CA Governor Brown Signs Human Right to Water
http://www.inlandvalleynews.com/2012/09/26/ca-governor-brown-signs-human-right-to-water/


Sacramento, CA–The basic human right to safe, clean, affordable and accessible water became part of state policy today when Governor Brown signed AB 685.

A.B. 685 directs relevant state agencies to advance the implementation of this policy when those agencies make administrative decisions pertinent to the use of water for human consumption, cooking, and sanitary purposes.

“Safe, affordable water is a basic essential of survival. We applaud the Legislature and the Governor for recognizing this and taking the bold action to cement it into law,” said Alecia Sanchez of the California Center for Public Health Advocacy (CCPHA), a member of the Safe Water Alliance that has worked on this issue.

For years, grassroots activists, community leaders, faith-based groups, and dedicated environmental justice, public health and environmental organizations, drawn together by a shared commitment to improve access to safe drinking water in our poorest communities, have been advocating at the local, regional, and state level, combating powerful, entrenched interests determined not to change the status quo in California water policy.

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Worse than NAFTA now off the Pacifric coast

Submitted: Sep 15, 2012
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board
All the corporations learned from NAFTA was how to make the next "regional" agreement worse. --BLJ
 
8-14-12
Food & Water Watch
If you thought NAFTA was bad, you ain't seen nothing yet
Mitch Jones

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/blogs/if-you-thought-nafta-was-bad-you-aint-seen-nothing-yet/#more-20955

 
 

Although no one in the media seems to be talking about it, a meeting is taking place in Virginia that could cement the same economic interests that lead us to the 2007 crisis. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) being negotiated by 13 countries would lead to increased gas exports and increased imported foods, while undermining our domestic laws and increasing the financialization of nature.

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A short note on God, Nature and man in Spinoza's Ethics

Submitted: Jul 05, 2012
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Immediately on finishing, in fact while still reading this appendix to the first part of Baruch Spinoza’s Ethics, we couldn’t help thinking of the many fine religious people, especially political leaders and decision-makers, who ‘paved paradise and put up a parking lot,’ often  in the name of the same god who had so guided man’s wisdom that he had created the greatest tool in history: an eternally rising real estate market.

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Sanctimonious "educator" abused students but dodged criminal prosecution through statute of limitations

Submitted: Nov 07, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

11-06-11
Modesto Bee
DA says Andersen knew of asbestos risk in Merced school
By Victor A. Patton
http://www.modbee.com/2011/11/06/1935528/merced-county-andersen-knew-of.html

MERCED -- Merced County's former education chief broke state law by knowing that high school students were exposed to cancer-causing asbestos, but waiting more than a year to notify law enforcement.

Those accusations have been lobbed against former Merced County Office of Education Superintendent Lee Andersen after an investigation by the Stanislaus County district attorney's office. Prosecutors say that Andersen would have been charged with a misdemeanor had the one-year statute of limitations not run out.

Andersen, in a letter to the Merced Sun-Star, insists he acted quickly to look into the asbestos exposure. He told a grand jury that he wasn't obliged to report it "because it was in the past." He asked the people of Merced to keep an open mind in reading the report.

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Railroads in the West: Now and then

Submitted: Jul 18, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

7-16-11

Merced Sun-Star

High-speed rail: Ag worries over project voiced

Elected officials and growers discuss effects on farmland… AMEERA BUTT

http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2011/07/16/v-print/1971373/high-speed-rail-ag-worries-over.html

Farmers in Merced County voiced their concerns about the impact of high-speed rail on ag land at a joint hearing organized by state senators Friday afternoon.

Sen. Anthony Cannella, R-Ceres, and Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord, who leads the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee, held a joint hearing, "From Food to Rail: High-Speed Rail Impacts on Agriculture" on Friday.

Sen. Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale, and Sen. Alan Lowenthal, D-Long Beach, also attended.

The event weighed the effects on ag land by the proposed railway, intended to carry passengers between San Francisco, Sacramento and Los Angeles by way of the San Joaquin Valley at speeds of up to 220 mph.

Cannella said the event provided a chance for politicians to hear from the agricultural community, a major part of California's economy. It generates more than $30 billion a year in revenue.

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