Public Health and Safety

Cardoza refuses to hold town hall meetings on health-care reform

Submitted: Aug 10, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Denny, the musician, speaks:

 

Modesto Blue Dog Democrat Dennis Cardoza, who was leaving Pelosi's office as liberals were streaming in, has more uninsured citizens in his district than any district in the nation. Cardoza, who wasn't among the four Blue Dogs who negotiated the deal but supports it, said the legislation will be "like an accordion for a long time, where members become concerned and then they get comfortable and then they become concerned. Everybody who has ever gone to the doctor has an opinion on what should be in this bill."—San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 5, 2009

 

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Latest in California water scams, shenanigans and boondoggles

Submitted: Aug 05, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

We invite you to join us in enjoying the fine journalism of the two best water writers in the state, Lloyd Carter and Dan Bacher, whose courageous writing is animated by the idea that people, wildlife and fish species, and natural resources matter and that California should not be ruled absolutely by finance, insurance and real estate special interests.

 

Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 

7-30-09

lloydgcarter.com

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Racism in Atwater City Hall

Submitted: Aug 03, 2009
By: 
Bill Hatch

 

The Merced Sun-Star recently reported on a number of pornographic racist emails being channeled through an Atwater City Hall computer server by Councilman Gary Frago. Last week, Atwater City Council held a hearing on the issue at the community center. About 300 people showed up.

 

To remove any suspense from this report, after hearing the testimony of 58 members of the public and oratory from four council members, the council voted unanimously (Frago not permitted to vote) 4-0, to direct staff to draft a letter of reprimand to Frago..

 

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Medical Assistance Program emergency

Submitted: Aug 02, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

Merced's Medical Assistance Program, which provides medical care to among the county's poorest residents, needs $500,000 or it will have to cut 400 patients off its eligibility list. The issue was heard at the July 21, 2009 Merced County Board of Supervisors meeting and board consideration of this issue will continue at the August 18, 2009 meeting.

 

Badlands Journal editorial board has several suggestions for the supervisors that would avoid cutting 400 patients off the MAP program, sending them to the far more expensive emergency room.

 

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Two ideas

Submitted: Jul 17, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

In the state Capitol, the conventional wisdom, what is politically possible, has bankrupted the state and put its most vital water resource, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, in so much peril that the only solution this wisdom can imagine is a peripheral canal.

 

Here are two unconventional ideas floating around outside the Capitol. That neither of them appear to be politically possible inside the Capitol is in itself an excellent argument for their consideration – not immediate adoption, but more careful consideration than the current attention being given to trying to float another $20-billion bond initiative for a peripheral canal in a state that now enjoys the worst bond rating in the nation, meanwhile slashing health and social services and education budgets in a state with more than 11-percent unemployment, the highest foreclosure numbers in the nation and a public education system nearly as bad as its bond rating.

 

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California water: some recent theological texts

Submitted: Jul 12, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Every culture has its sacred texts. Chinese, the Sumerians, Indians, Persians, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, Arabs -- and on and on. You name the culture and we'll name the sacred text -- from the I Ching to the Koran and beyond. It is the world's greatest literature,

the true treasury of the deepest human values and highest human visions.

 

In California, we have the water news. Because we are so young, dynamic and full of the belief that economic growth equals population growth, the notion that natural resources, especially water, may have limits, has created a theological crisis here in California.

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The PR Firm from Hell, Part 1

Submitted: Jul 01, 2009
By: 
Lloyd Carter

THE PR FIRM FROM HELL
As published in the June 30th, 2009 edition of the Fresno Community Alliance newspaper
(First of two parts)
By Lloyd G. Carter

http://www.lloydgcarter.com/content/090629251_the-pr-firm-from-hell  

    Cesar Chavez knew the power of a good march. He led by example and he never stopped trying until he found a way. And this is exactly what we are going to do. We never will stop until we find a way, find a way together here, because this is the right thing to do, because we need water, we need water, we need water, we need water [chanting with crowd]. --

            Gov. Schwarzenegger, on April 17, at the San Luis Reservoir, following a four-day grower-funded march in which non-union farmworkers were paid to walk 50 miles from Mendota.  Chavez’ United Farm Workers union did not participate.  UFW co-founder Dolores Huerta called it shameless exploitation of the late labor leader’s legacy.

 

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Your local "high-tech, bio-tech engine for growth" at work

Submitted: May 09, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Speak Memory: During the entire run-up to approval of UC Merced and construction of its first phase, including all the bogus environmental review documents and the illegal water and sewer hookups with the City of Merced, boosters from the Regents to UC presidents Roger Atkinson and Robert Dynes, UC Merced's first chancellor, Carol Tomlinson-Keasey ("the Cowgirl Chancellor"),  representatives Gary Condit and Dennis Cardoza and their talented staffs, former state Sen. Dick Monteith (who declared the campus a "done deal" before it was, actually, a done deal), every realtor, bank and local land owner and local elected official (if a distinction between these classes can be discerned), every planner, our own Sonny Star, the local gigolo press, and most of all, the Great Valley Center (now a UC Merced partner), declared that the campus would be a "high-tech, bio-tech engine for growth in the San Joaquin Valley." We were promised another Silicon Valley right on the banks of Bear Creek, bright young things full of bright young ideas would be starting companies right and left, so we had to build proper housing for them here, there, and everywhere.

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Something about 40 roosters

Submitted: Apr 25, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

We were curious about an agenda item for the Merced County Planning Commission that appeared in late February: "To permit (legalize) the raising of up to 40 roosters as a hobby and occasional sales, on a 9.7 acre parcel."

When we read further, we realized we'd passed this rooster ranch in Stevinson not long before and had commented that someone must be raising fighting cocks on the site. There seemed no other explanation for a field full of little pens holding individual roosters that did not look like White Leghorns or Plymouth Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds, Araucanas, Banties or any other typical barnyard variety of chicken. They looked like gamecocks. It was our general impression that cockfighting is supposed to be illegal in California, although it is a law widely disobeyed since its passage. We were also aware of something of a campaign against raising gamefowl in the county in recent years and a number of cockfight busts. So, we, the perpetually ignorant public, wondered what this agenda item could be doing in front of the planning commission rather than on the Sheriff's blotter. We asked someone at a county office about it, but she just rolled her eyes and said she didn't always read the documents she distributed.

Members of the public called the editorial board and suggested they watch the video of the planning commission meeting. They said it was one of the most mysterious moments they had ever witnessed in local government.

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Don't let Bush's ESA rules stand

Submitted: Mar 20, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

This item below courtesy of the Center for Biodiversity, brings us up-to-date on Bush's lame-duck anti-Endangered Species Act regulations, what Obama has done about them, what he hasn't don't about them, and what remains to be done to get rid of them in the next several weeks.

 

 

3-18-09

Center for Biological Diversity

(415) 632-5319 for more information

Secretary of Interior Should Rescind Bush Endangered Species Act Rules —

Congressional Authorization Expires in 53 Days

Shortly before leaving office, the Bush administration issued three regulations that (1) remove the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as an independent, scientific watchdog over potentially damaging federal projects such as timber sales, mines, and dams; (2) exempt all greenhouse gas-emitting projects, including coal-fired power plants and federal fuel efficiency standards, from Endangered Species Act review; and (3) specifically ban federal agencies from protecting the imperiled polar bear from greenhouse gas emissions. These policies eviscerate the central Endangered Species Act process — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service oversight — that has protected endangered species for 35 years, and they exclude the greatest future threat to endangered species — global warming — from consideration under the Act.

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