May, 2013

Carter and Porgans on Valley water quality

Submitted: May 23, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

Dirty Water, Dirty Tricks

 

By Patrick Porgans & Lloyd G. Carter

Part One of a two-part series

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Destroy the world but Save the engineers

Submitted: May 21, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

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Oregon forest "terrorist" admits coaching kindergarten soccer

Submitted: May 20, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board
"I coach kindergarten soccer," says Jason Gonzales of Cascadia Forest Defenders. He testified against the bill and questioned lawmakers' priorities. "We have students, we are professionals, we meet with governors, we present at panels.  And when it’s the last resort we put our bodies on the line."
 
5-14-2013
Vice.com
NEW LAWS WOULD MAKE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTEST “TERRORISM”
By Will Potter
http://www.vice.com/read/new-laws-would-make-protesting-environmental-devastation-terrorism
Most people have heard of tree-sitting—a tactic environmentalists use to prevent old-growth trees from being cut down and whole forests decimated. In its heyday, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, members of groups like Earth First! climbed 100-foot-tall Redwoods and stayed there to save them. Beginning in 1997, one woman in Humboldt, California, named her tree Luna and stayed in it for two years, until enough money could be raised to prevent it from being axed. In 1998, in a Northern California old-growth forest, another treesitter named David Gypsy Chain was “accidentally” killed when loggers felled a tree that came crashing into the protester.
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Oops

Submitted: May 18, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 The problem of groundwater depletion is obviously inseparable from the political/legal failure to solve it. In the San Joaquin Valley, one of the most severely over-drafted areas in the country, volunteer groups assembled to qualify for state-funded grants to "solve" groundwater problems, at least here in Merced, are being fed a local governance model from San Diego County, where groundwater depletion has barely gotten started. The mighty political instruments being brought to bear on our region, where land subsidence is an issue, are a greed for public grants vetted through a process involving a half-dozen nuances of consensus. 

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"79yrs old and still as Old and Evil as Hell itself.."

Submitted: May 12, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 Merced County Supervisor, John "Ol'Slippery" Pedrozo don't fell in it again, proving that if the money's good enough, Ol' Slippery will grab a toboggan for a ride down the next manure pile in his political career. 

The short article just below from Crazifornia.com says about all anyone needs to say about the first contract for the state's high speed rail project "that will tie the megopolis of Madera to the global finance center of Fresno" was "won" by a consortium controlled by Richard Blum, aka Mr. Dianne Feinstein.

Ol' Slippery knows his manure piles real good and this one smells plum delicious to the former dairyman rumored by members of his own family to have gone belly up before entering politics at the rear of the milking string to squelch the candidacies of a couple of Hispanic women who were interested in poverty and stuff. 

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Latest invasion of Grenada

Submitted: May 08, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

It just doesn't make investment sense to pour money into alternative technologies when such a splendid speculative bubble is developing over the Monterey Shale Formation, promising to be the largest fracking bonanza of them all in the nation. So, the US hurtles onward to extract more petroleum to create more global warming while polluting more groundwater. Power without care is an abomination.

Badlands Journal editorial board

5-7-13

myFoxla.com

Encroaching sea already a threat in Caribbean

http://www.myfoxla.com/story/22184745/encroaching-sea-already-a-threat-in-caribbean

TELESCOPE, Grenada (AP) - The old coastal road in this fishing village at the eastern edge of Grenada sits under a couple of feet of murky saltwater, which regularly surges past a hastily-erected breakwater of truck tires and bundles of driftwood intended to hold back the Atlantic Ocean.

 

For Desmond Augustin and other fishermen living along the shorelines of the southern Caribbean island, there's nothing theoretical about the threat of rising sea levels.

 

"The sea will take this whole place down," Augustin said as he stood on the stump of one of the uprooted palm trees that line the shallows off his village of tin-roofed shacks built on stilts. "There's not a lot we can do about it except move higher up."

 

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Another petroleum by-product

Submitted: May 07, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 People who take seriously the information that the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere is cvurrently at 390 ppm when science has stated that the tipping point (where catastrophic sea-level rise begins) is at 350 ppm, observe the current debate about oil – from academic institutional and state and national environmental groups’ divestment of holdings in fossil fuel firms to California’s governor, the Great Reflector’s jitterbugging on fracking the Monterey Shale Formation – and could notice that political hypocrisy is also a petroleum by-product.

 

Badlands Journal editorial board

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