Branding manure and other acts of antic agrarian acquisition

Submitted: Apr 26, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 The Great California Drought, now in year five (though Northern Cal is getting some temporary relief), is the worst drought in California history. According to NASA we are currently trillions (yes, trillions) of gallons below where we should be in groundwater. This has forced us to deplete our precious aquifers—many that took millennia to fill. Recently, NASA, using satellites to measure underground water supplies, found was that nearly one in seven US aquifers are so depleted that they must now be classified as ‘extremely” or “highly” stressed, and that California’s Central Valley Aquifer—which is being sucked dry to help drought-stricken farms in our core growing region—is now by far the most troubled in the United States. Jay Famiglietti, senior water scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who lead the study, called the situation “critical,” adding that “we are running out of groundwater.” According to the federal government nine cities in California are at risk of going bone dry, and some small towns are already needing to truck in water for daily use.-- Kopald and Chouinard, Huffington Post, April 20, 2016

 

"We" didn't deplete our precious reservoirs. Farmers and ranchers did and government did not stop them. Banks willing to lend on the huge pumps helped. Nor will government stop them in the future, despite whatever Save-the-Aquifer bills pass the Legislature and Congress because agribusiness and the finance, insurance and real estate special interests behind it do not wish it so.

So, "Turning and turning" in an ever tightening vortex, these hawk-beaked peddlers of elite yuppie schlock have decided to return to Back in the Day when Small was Beautiful, everybody who was anybody repaired their own running shoes, studied their own Whole Earth Catalogue, and used only the most expensive English-made spades to double-dug their French bio-intensive pot patches.

And long live J. Mogador Griffin!

Yes, it is true that soil fertility is helpful and presumably one could find some way of patenting and branding green manure. Sillier things have been done in the name of agriculture by that class of small landowners that "workshop" rather than work their land, and buzz from farming fad to fad like bees who have permanently lost their way. For these people, it is always preferable that the news comes from NASA or some other agency of Outer Space.

However, any of dozens of articles that John Bellamy Foster and his collaborators at Monthly Review have written on Marx's concept of the metabolic rift are more sensible than any of these outpourings of perpetual grant grifters and apologists for capitalist agriculture. All of this -- the whole topic of loss of soil fertility (including moisture retention) -- was defined, examined and studied by great soil scientists in the mid-19th century, when, if it had not been for the discovery and thorough exploitation of the guano islands off the coast of Ecuador and Peru, the loss of soil fertility in Europe and North America might have been absolutely disastrous to these rapidly developing imperial political economies. In fact, in 1856, the US passed the Guano Island Act, which declared that the US could take possession of any island anywhere in the world that contained deposits of bird dung and was not occupied or within the jurisdiction of another nation.  In those days, many slaves working cotton in the South were branded. These days, many working in California agriculture to pay off debt are branded "illegal aliens."

Soon, workshoppin' farmers will be branding horseshit.

--blj

 

 

 

4-20-16

Huff Post Green

Water for Farmers, Even During a Drought

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·         <!--[endif]-->Larry Kopald--Branding and communication strategist, longtime environmental activist

Cowritten by Yvon Chouinard, Founder, Patagonia

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/larry-kopald/water-for-farmers-even-du_b_9743764.html

Former Hewlett-Packard CEO and ex-presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina said recently that environmentalists were the cause of water problems in California because they had blocked the creation of more dams in the state. She was quickly raked over the coals by environmentalists, who pointed out that it doesn’t matter how much storage you have if you have no water to store. Turns out both sides are missing the point. And the opportunity.

The Great California Drought, now in year five (though Northern Cal is getting some temporary relief), is the worst drought in California history. According to NASA we are currently trillions (yes, trillions) of gallons below where we should be in groundwater. This has forced us to deplete our precious aquifers—many that took millennia to fill. Recently, NASA, using satellites to measure underground water supplies, found was that nearly one in seven US aquifers are so depleted that they must now be classified as ‘extremely” or “highly” stressed, and that California’s Central Valley Aquifer—which is being sucked dry to help drought-stricken farms in our core growing region—is now by far the most troubled in the United States. Jay Famiglietti, senior water scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who lead the study, called the situation “critical,” adding that “we are running out of groundwater.” According to the federal government nine cities in California are at risk of going bone dry, and some small towns are already needing to truck in water for daily use.

So where’s the good news? Truth is, we’re standing on it. And more precisely, we’re farming on it. New data on soil from around the world shows that if we modify our approaches to how we grow our food we could reduce the amount of water necessary by as much as 80 percent, depending on the crop. And we can do this while maintaining similar yields and making our agriculture industry more resilient.

The science is actually fairly simple. Healthy soil is brimming with living organisms—billions in a single spoonful. To support these micro-organisms soil needs to store water for them, which it does by creating humus, an organic component of soil that stores forty times its weight in water. So think of healthy soil as a huge sponge A really huge sponge that acts like a water battery during droughts. Studies by the Rodale Institute have shown that years into a drought healthy soil is still producing food— even without irrigated water.

So the big question is—are we doing this—and if not, why not?

The quick answer is no. Most of the state uses industrial agriculture techniques, which include mono-crops, severe tilling, and widespread use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. These techniques kill those micro-organisms in the soil, taking the health of the soil with them. Studies of industrial farms have shown a reduction in the organic matter by as much as 90 percent. And when that disappears, so does the soil’s natural ability to store water.

The good news is that we can reverse this quickly. According to Dr. Christine Jones, one of the world’s foremost scientists on groundcover and soil, and also verified by Dr. Rattan Lal at Ohio State University, every one percent of organic matter we restore in the soil results in the retention of 20,000-60,000 gallons of water per acre. With 27,000,000 acres of planted cropland and 63,000,000 acres of range grasslands in the state, that adds up to a stored potential of 1.8 to 5.4 trillion gallons.

Accomplishing this may be easier than you think. Depending on the soil and what’s being raised, it comes down to adding compost and managing the soil in a regenerative manner. For crops, that means cover crops, no (or very shallow) tilling, and reduced use of synthetic chemicals. For grazing livestock it means using moveable paddocks with dense herds so cattle can be managed in a way that replicates how herd animals move in nature, which benefits the soil instead of depleting it.

We can help make this happen by supporting bills like SB 367, which would fund agricultural projects in California that store water (as well as carbon), and by supporting Governor Brown’s Healthy Soils Initiative, which could protect our agriculture industry, our water, and even positively affect climate change from this moment on.

As to Carly Fiorina’s comments about needing more dams to solve the water crisis, here’s a novel way to look at it: according to Russ Conserv, an engineer who ran Shell Oil’s Gamechangers Division, adding one percent of organic matter to California’s agricultural soil would store the equivalent of up to 16 Folsom dams.

So if you’re looking to increase California’s water supply and help our agriculture industry at the same time, look down. You might just be standing on a puddle. A big, state-wide, permanent 
puddle.

—-

Yvon Chouinard is founder of outdoor clothing and gear company Patagonia, known for its environmental leadership and commitment to use business to inspire and implement solutions to environmental crises.

Larry Kopald is a co-founder of The Carbon Underground, a science and communications based non-profit working to restore soil as a means to mitigate climate change, droughts and better feed the planet.

Follow Larry Kopald on Twitter: www.twitter.com/lkopald

FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL CODE 
SECTION 560-568 
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560.  This article shall be known as the Cannella Environmental

Farming Act of 1995.

 

 

 

561.  The Legislature finds and declares the following:

   (a) California agriculture helps to feed the world and fuel our

economy. Agriculture provides one out of every 10 jobs in California,

and our state has led the nation in total farm production every year

since 1948. During 1993, California's 76,000 farms generated nearly

$20 billion in cash receipts and another $70 billion in economic

activity.

   (b) Many farmers engage in practices that contribute to the

well-being of ecosystems, air quality, and wildlife and their

habitat. Agriculture plays a pivotal role in preserving open space

that is vital to the environment. Seventy-five percent of the nation'

s wildlife live on farms and ranches. Freshwater streams and

stockponds on farms and ranches provide habitat to millions of fish.

Corn, wheat, rice, and other field crops provide bountiful food and

habitat for deer, antelope, ducks, geese, and other wildlife.

   (c) Environmental laws should be based on the best scientific

evidence gathered from public and private sources.

   (d) Best scientific evidence should include the net environmental

impact provided by agriculture.

   (e) Additional research is necessary to adequately inventory the

impact that agriculture has on the environment. Recognition should be

afforded to agricultural activities that produce a net benefit for

the environment, which is consistent with the growing trend of

providing incentives for the private sector to undertake economic

activities that benefit the environment.

 

 

564.  Unless the context otherwise requires, the following

definitions govern the construction of this article:

   (a) "Agricultural activities" means those activities that generate

products as specified in Section 54004.

   (b) "Department" means the Department of Food and Agriculture.

   (c) "Panel" means the Scientific Advisory Panel on Environmental

Farming.

   (d) "Secretary" means the Secretary of Food and Agriculture.

 

 

 

566.  (a) The department shall establish and oversee an

environmental farming program. The program shall provide incentives

to farmers whose practices promote the well-being of ecosystems, air

quality, and wildlife and their habitat.

   (b) The department may assist in the compilation of scientific

evidence from public and private sources, including the scientific

community, industry, conservation organizations, and federal, state,

and local agencies identifying the net environmental impacts that

agriculture creates for the environment. The department shall serve

as the depository of this information and provide it to federal,

state, and local governments, as needed.

   (c) The department shall conduct the activities specified in this

article with existing resources, to the extent they are available.

 

 

 

 

568.  (a) The secretary shall convene a five-member Scientific

Advisory Panel on Environmental Farming to advise and assist federal,

state, and local government agencies on issues relating to air,

water, and wildlife habitat to do the following:

   (1) Review data on the impact that agriculture has on the

environment and recommend to appropriate state agencies data that the

panel approves as scientifically valid. A state agency that receives

data recommended by the panel may adopt and incorporate the data

into the appropriate program. If a state agency does not utilize the

data recommended by the panel, it shall provide the panel with a

written statement of reasons for not utilizing the data. The reasons,

at a minimum, shall specify the scientific basis for not utilizing

the data. The reasons shall be provided within 180 days of receiving

the data from the panel.

   (2) Compile the net environmental impacts that agriculture creates

for the environment, identified pursuant to paragraph (1).

   (3) Research, review, and comment on data upon which proposed

environmental policies and regulatory programs are based to ensure

that the environmental impacts of agricultural activities are

accurately portrayed and to identify incentives that may be provided

to encourage agricultural practices with environmental benefits.

   (4) Assist government agencies to incorporate benefits identified

pursuant to paragraph (1) into environmental regulatory programs.

   (b) Members of the panel shall be highly qualified and

professionally active or engaged in the conduct of scientific

research. Of the members first appointed to the panel, two shall

serve for a term of two years and three shall serve for a term of

three years, as determined by lot. Thereafter, members shall be

appointed for a term of three years. The members shall be appointed

as follows:

   (1) Three members shall be appointed by the secretary. At least

one of these members shall have a minimum of five years of training

and experience in the field of agriculture and shall represent

production agriculture.

   (2) One member, who has a minimum of five years of training and

experience in the field of human health or environmental science,

shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Environmental Protection

Agency.

   (3) One member, who has a minimum of five years of training and

experience in the field of resource management, shall be appointed by

the Secretary of the Resources Agency.

   (c) The panel may establish ad hoc committees, which may include

professionals or scientists, to assist it in performing its

functions.

   (d) The panel shall be created and maintained with funds made

available from existing resources within the department to the extent

they are available.

 

 

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          |SENATE RULES COMMITTEE            |                        SB 367|

          |Office of Senate Floor Analyses   |                              |

          |(916) 651-1520    Fax: (916)      |                              |

          |327-4478                          |                              |

          |                                  |                              |

           -----------------------------------------------------------------

                                   THIRD READING

 

          Bill No:  SB 367

          Author:   Wolk (D)

          Amended:  6/2/15 

          Vote:     21 

 

           SENATE AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE:  5-0, 4/7/15

           AYES:  Galgiani, Cannella, Berryhill, Pan, Wolk

 

           SENATE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY COMMITTEE:  7-0, 4/29/15

           AYES:  Wieckowski, Gaines, Bates, Hill, Jackson, Leno, Pavley

 

           SENATE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE:  7-0, 5/28/15

           AYES:  Lara, Bates, Beall, Hill, Leyva, Mendoza, Nielsen

 

           SUBJECT:   Agricultural lands:  greenhouse gases

         

          SOURCE:    California Climate and Agricultural Network

                     Community Alliance with Family Farmers

          

          DIGEST:   This bill recasts and expands the membership and the 

          duties of the California Department of Food and Agriculture's 

          (CDFA) Science Advisory Panel on Environmental Farming to 

          include on-farm practices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and 

          increase carbon storage in soil.  This bill appropriates $25 

          million from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund to CDFA for the 

          establishment of a new grant program to support these  

          activities.  This bill also appropriates 2% of the proceeds from 

          this fund to the Strategic Growth Council's Sustainable 

          Agricultural Lands Conservation Program to also address on-farm 

          reductions of greenhouse gas and increased carbon storage.

 

          ANALYSIS:  

 

          Existing law:

 

          1)Requires the CDFA, through the Cannella Environmental Farming 

            Act of 1995, to establish and oversee an environmental farming 

 

 

 

 

 

            program that provides incentives to farmers whose practices 

            promote the well-being of ecosystems, air quality, and 

            wildlife and their habitat. 

 

          2)Establishes the Scientific Advisory Panel on Environmental 

            Farming (Science Panel) to, among other responsibilities, 

            advise and assist government agencies on the above issues by 

            conducting scientific data reviews and approving and 

            recommending scientifically valid data.   

            

           3)Establishes in 2008 the Strategic Growth Council as a 

            cabinet-level committee that is tasked with coordinating the 

            activities of member state agencies to, among other things, 

            improve air and water quality, protect natural resources and 

            agricultural lands, and assist state and local entities in the 

            planning of sustainable communities and meeting AB 32 (Nunez, 

            Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) goals. 

 

          4)Establishes the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities 

            (AHSC) Program, administered by the Strategic Growth Council 

            in 2014, to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions though 

            projects that implement land use, housing, transportation, and 

            agricultural land preservation practices. 

           

           5)Establishes the Sustainable Agricultural Lands Conservation 

            (SALC) Program as one component of the AHSC and is implemented 

            by the California Department of Conservation (DOC).  The 

            Strategic Growth Council is responsible for overseeing SALC 

            and coordinating DOC with other agencies to develop program 

            guidelines.

 

          6)Requires the California Air Resources Board (ARB), through the 

            California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (referred to 

            as AB 32, Health and Safety Code §38500 et seq.), to determine 

            the 1990 statewide GHG emissions level, to approve a statewide 

            GHG emissions limit equivalent to that level that will be 

            achieved by 2020, and to adopt GHG emissions reductions 

            measures by regulation.  ARB is authorized to include the use 

            of market-based mechanisms to comply with the regulations.  

            All monies, except for fines and penalties, collected pursuant 

            to a market-based mechanism are deposited in the Greenhouse 

            Gas Reduction Fund (GGRF). (According to the Senate 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            Environmental Quality Committee analysis).

 

          7)Requires that the GGRF only be used to facilitate the 

            achievement of reductions of GHG emissions consistent with AB 

            32 (Health and Safety Code §39710 et seq.).  To this end, the 

            Department of Finance, in consultation with the ARB and any 

            other relevant state agencies, is required to develop, as 

            specified, a three-year investment plan for the moneys 

            deposited in the GGRF.  The investment plan must allocate a 

            minimum of 25% of the funds to projects that benefit 

            disadvantaged communities and to allocate 10% of the funds to 

            projects located within disadvantaged communities.  

            Additionally, ARB, in consultation with California 

            Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA), is required to 

            develop funding guidelines for administering agencies 

            receiving allocations of GGRF funds that include a component 

            for how agencies should maximize benefits to disadvantaged 

            communities. (According to the Senate Environmental Quality 

            Committee analysis).

 

          This bill:

 

           1) Makes findings and declarations in regards to California 

             agricultural productivity and agriculture's contribution to 

             the environment and reduction of GHGs.

 

           2) Renames CDFA's Scientific Advisory Panel on Environmental 

             Farming to the Environmental Farming Advisory Panel (Advisory 

             Panel).

 

           3) Expands the duties of CDFA's Environmental Farming Program 

             (EFP) to specifically include activities related to the 

             reduction of on-farm GHG emissions and increased carbon 

             storage in agricultural soils and woody biomass.

 

           4) Authorizes CDFA to support these on-farm practices and 

             activities by providing permit assistance and coordination 

             and the funding of on-farm demonstration projects.

 

           5) Deletes CDFA's authority to assist in the compilation and 

             depository of scientific data from public and private sources 

             identifying the net environmental impacts of agriculture on 

 

 

 

 

 

             the environment.

 

           6) Adds "climate change" to the list of issues that may be 

             addressed by CDFA's newly termed Advisory Panel when 

             providing advice and assistance to government agencies.

 

           7) Recasts and expands the duties and membership of the 

             Advisory Panel as specified.

 

           8) Provides $25 million, upon appropriation by the Legislature, 

             to CDFA to support on-farm projects to demonstrate 

             agricultural management practices and activities that reduce 

             GHG emissions and increase carbon storage in soils and woody 

             biomass.  Projects may include, but are not limited to, 

             soil-building and carbon-sequestration practices, irrigation 

             efficiency and water conservation measures, on-farm 

             alternative-energy production and efficiency, and wildlife 

             habitat conservation.

 

           9) Requires CDFA, in consultation with the Advisory Panel, to 

             develop and implement a grant program to support the 

             activities listed above.

 

           10)Requires the secretaries of CDFA and the Natural Resources 

             Agency to enter into a memorandum of agreement, including 

             other relevant state agencies, to ensure the greatest 

             possible coordination and collaboration in implementing these 

             programs and projects.

 

           11)Requires that no less than 2% of GGRF proceeds be 

             appropriated to the Strategic Growth Council to be expended 

             for agricultural land protection within the grant program, 

             below.

 

           12)Requires the Strategic Growth Council to establish and 

             administer a grant program, as part of the SALC Program, to 

             provide incentives for the adoption and use of land 

             management practices that would reduce GHG emissions and 

             sequester carbon in soils and woody biomass.

            

          Background

 

 

 

 

 

          The Cannella Environmental Farming Act of 1995 requires the CDFA 

          to establish and oversee an environmental farming program that 

          provides incentives to farmers whose practices promote the 

          well-being of ecosystems, air quality, and wildlife and their 

          habitat.  The act also created the Science Panel to, among other 

          responsibilities, advise and assist government agencies on these 

          issues by conducting scientific data reviews and approving and 

          recommending scientifically valid data.  The Science Panel is 

          also authorized to research, review, and comment on data used as 

          the base for proposed environmental policies and regulatory 

          programs so that agricultural activities are accurately 

          portrayed and to identify incentives to encourage agricultural 

          practices with environmental benefits. 

 

          The Strategic Growth Council was created in 2008 as a 

          cabinet-level committee that is tasked with coordinating the 

          activities of member state agencies to improve air and water 

          quality, protect natural resources and agricultural lands, 

          increase the availability of affordable housing, promote public 

          health, improve transportation, encourage greater infill and 

          compact development, revitalize community and urban centers, and 

          assist state and local entities in the planning of sustainable 

          communities and meeting AB 32 goals. 

 

          The AHSC Program, administered by the Strategic Growth Council, 

          was created in 2014 to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 

          though projects that implement land use, housing, 

          transportation, and agricultural land preservation practices.  

          The AHSC Program receives 20% of the annual proceeds from the 

          Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund to achieve these goals (SB 862 of 

          2014; Health and Safety Code § 39719). 

 

          The SALC Program is one component of the AHSC and is implemented 

          by the DOC.  The Strategic Growth Council is responsible for 

          overseeing the SALC Program and coordinating DOC with other 

          agencies to develop program guidelines.

 

          Guidelines for the SALC Program were approved by the Strategic 

          Growth Council on January 20, 2015, and include three major 

          elements: 1) sustainable agricultural land strategy plans, which 

          would provide grants to develop local strategies to ensure 

          long-term protection of highly productive and critically 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          threatened agricultural land; 2) agricultural conservation 

          easements; and 3) financial incentives for adoption and use of 

          land management practices.  The guidelines specifically state 

          that the third element is not included in the 2014 request for 

          grant applications, but will be addressed in future years.

 

          Background on Cap-and-Trade Funds. ARB has conducted ten 

          cap-and-trade auctions, generating almost $1.6 billion in 

          proceeds to the state. 

 

          Budget allocations.  The 2014-15 Budget allocates $832 million 

          in GGRF revenues to a variety of transportation, energy, and 

          resources programs aimed at reducing GHG emissions.  Various 

          agencies are in the process of implementing this funding.  The 

          budget agreement specifies how the state will allocate most 

          cap-and-trade auction revenues in 2015-16 and beyond.  For all 

          future revenues, the legislation appropriates 25% for the 

          state's high-speed rail project, 20% for affordable housing and 

          sustainable communities grants, 10% to intercity capital rail 

          projects, and 5% for low-carbon transit operations.  The 

          remaining 40% is available for annual appropriation by the 

          Legislature.  (According to the Senate Environmental Quality 

          Committee analysis).

 

          Comments

         

          Agriculture and Climate Change.  Farmers and ranchers are 

          uniquely sensitive to the effects of climate change as 

          agriculture is largely dependent upon uncertain weather patterns 

          and the availability of natural resources.  For example, the 

          current multi-year drought has caused many farmers to fallow 

          fields, sell livestock due to lack of available grazing, and 

          lay-off employees due to reduced workload and productivity.

 

          The potential for agriculture to contribute to the reduction of 

          climate change by sequestering carbon and reducing GHG emissions 

          is not fully realized or utilized.  Plants absorb CO2 from the 

          atmosphere and use it to grow, produce fruits and vegetables, 

          and to also store carbon in the soil.  Animals produce manure 

          that could be used to create energy (through methane digesters), 

          compost, and several other valuable products, while reducing the 

          emission of methane and other GHG.  Land management practices 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          have been and are continuing to be adopted to reduce negative 

          effects on the environment such as drip irrigation, reduced land 

          tillage, nitrogen management, and the use of cover crops.  This 

          bill would provide funding to continue the development and 

          implementation of on-farm management practices to further the 

          environmental benefits of California's agricultural lands.

 

          [Note:  See Senate Agriculture Committee and Senate 

          Environmental Quality Committee analyses for a full discussion 

          of this bill]

         

          FISCAL EFFECT:   Appropriation:    Yes         Fiscal 

          Com.:YesLocal:   No

 

          According to the Senate Appropriations Committee, "This bill 

          would specify that $25 million shall be available, upon 

          appropriation by the Legislature, to support three specific 

          programs at CDFA."

          

          SUPPORT:  (Verified  6/2/15)

 

          California Climate and Agriculture Network (CalCAN) (co-source)

          Community Alliance with Family Farmers (co-source)

          Abbott Ranch

          Agricola: flora et fauna

          Alameda County Resource Conservation District

          American Farmland Trust

          Association of Compost Producers

          Audubon California

          Berry Blest Farm

          Big Bluff Ranch

          Burroughs Family Farms

          Burroughs Family Orchards

          Burrows Ranch, Inc.

          Cachuma Resource Conservation District

          California Association of Resource Conservation Districts

          California Certified Organic Farmers

          California Cloverleaf Farms

          California Compost Coalition

          California Farm Bureau Federation

          California FarmLink

          California Institute for Rural Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                    

 

 

          California League of Conservation Voters

          California State Grange

          Californians Against Waste

          Camp Grant Ranch

          Canvas Ranch

          Carbon Cycle Institute

          Center for Food Safety

          Central Valley Farmland Trust

          Coastal Environmental Rights Foundation

          Community Environmental Council

          Defenders of Wildlife

          Dixon Ridge Farms

          Eaton Cattle Co.

          Ecological Farming Association

          Eden Urban Farms

          Environment California

          Environmental Action Committee of West Marin

          Environmental Defense Fund

          Environmental Entrepreneurs

          Four Elements Organics

          Foxwhelp Farm

          Frog Hollow Farm

          Full Belly Farm

          Grass Valley Grains

          Green Oaks Creek Farm

          Greenbelt Alliance

          Harpos Organics

          Hilltop & Canyon Farms

          Humboldt Regeneration Brewery & Farm

          Jackrabbit Farms

          Jacobs Farm/Del Cabo

          Kern Family Farm

          Land Trust of Santa Cruz County

          Live Earth Farm

          Mamen Consulting

          Markegard Family Grass-Fed, LLC

          Molino Creek Farm

          Morris Grassfed

          Occidental Arts and Ecology Center

          Page's Organics

          Paicines Ranch

          Peninsula Open Space Trust

 

 

          Pie Ranch

          Porter Creek Vineyards

          Quetzal Farm

          Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County

          Riverdance Farms

          Rominger Brothers Farm

          Roots of Change

          Samuels Ranch

          San Diego Roots Sustainable Food Project

          San Mateo County Resource Conservation District

          Santa Clara Valley Open Space Authority

          Sierra Farms Lamb

          Sonoma Resource Conservation District

          Sustainable Agriculture Education

          Sustainable Conservation

          Swanton Berry Farm

          The Mendocino Grain Project

          The Trust for Public Land

          Travaille & Phippen, Inc.

          Valley Land Alliance

          Viriditas Farm

          Wild Farm Alliance

          Wild Willow Farm and Education Center

          Yolo County Resource Conservation District

 

          OPPOSITION:   (Verified6/2/15)

 

          California Chamber of Commerce

 

          ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT:  According to the author, "The 

          modernization of the twenty-year old Environmental Farming Act 

          gives the California Department of Food and Agriculture the 

          authority and resources to more effectively deliver programs and 

          improve growers' access to resources for addressing climate 

          change and other pressing environmental concerns."

 

          According to those in support, "Growers around the state have 

          already begun to see the effects of drought, decreased chilling 

          hours and extreme heat on their productivity and profitability.  

          At the same time, growers and scientists recognize the 

          tremendous potential for agriculture and agricultural lands to 

          not only reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions, but also to 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                     SB 367  

                                                                    Page  10

 

 

 

          draw down atmospheric carbon into soils and woody biomass."

 

          ARGUMENTS IN OPPOSITION:     According to the California Chamber 

          of Commerce, "CalChamber supports the cost-effective 

          implementation of AB 32.  CARB's decision to arbitrarily 

          withhold and sell (auction) allowances will raise billions of 

          dollars at the expense of California businesses and consumers.  

          This approach runs contrary to expressed goals of AB 32, which 

          is maximizing benefits and minimizing leakage risks and costs.  

          As CalChamber has long held, CARB lacks authority to raise 

          revenue through the auction of allowances.  Given the 

          substantial legal uncertainties surrounding CARB's authority to 

          impose an auction, expending the proceeds is premature;" 

          therefore the California Chamber of Commerce is opposed to this 

          bill that would fund on-farm agricultural management projects 

          with AB 32 auction revenues.

 

 

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